Underrated Assets: Suit Texture

I’ll probably get ridiculed for saying this by die-hard classicists, but navy suits are vastly overrated.

Don’t get me wrong. I don’t dislike them. I will always feel obliged to own one; in certain situations, both professional and personal, nothing else will do.

But their proudest owners are so doggedly attached to them, so reluctant to wear anything else that they have begun to irritate me.

“They’re the smartest suits, and the most flattering” one acquaintance argued.

“Precisely” chimes another “you can wear any colour shirt or tie with them. They’re faultless.”

It’s true that navy is an excellent border for colourful shirts and ties. The darkness of the tone brings the brightness of other items to the fore.

But the real problem of navy suits is that the fabric always looks cheaper than it actually is. Particularly on a bright, sunny day.

I met some professional acquaintances recently on a warm, clement day in Mayfair. The women were strutting the streets in oversized white sunglasses; the Gulf-plated Rolls Royces had their roofs down, and were wafting through the streets like Rivas down the Grand Canal.

It was an idyllic day. However, it was also a working day and unfortunately, we were obliged to talk shop, so decided it might make it more bearable to lunch al fresco.

Both men were wearing navy suits in fine super wool and neither of them lost any time in telling me that they had them made at the same bespoke tailor. They were obviously well cut; the shoulders smooth and well-shaped, the waist sculpted and flattering.

However, aside from the cut, you couldn’t tell these suits cost in excess of £1000. In the bright sunshine, the smooth texture of the super wool reflected the light, making them look shiny. The navy, which in darker interiors and on a cloudy day was richly saturated, looked washed out and the fabrics – which were, they informed me, decent quality VBC – looked far cheaper than they actually were.

On the way back from the lunch, I walked past an elderly gentleman in a hopsack navy suit. The shoulders on his jacket were a little off, and he was about two chest sizes smaller than the garment, but somehow, the rougher texture married well with the bright sunshine. There was no shine, just a deep, matte blue.

In short, the super wools that proliferate and dominate the inventories of entry level online tailors aren’t as sophisticated as they sound. In fact, they can make a beautifully made suit look rather cheap. The fineness of the weave creates a smooth surface that is more reflective and under the harsh scrutiny of a midday sun is distractingly glossy.

There are two solutions I would advocate; wear a light grey sharkskin or Glen check – which look far superior when the sky is blue and the sun is high – or only purchase navy suits with a texture. A textured fabric also has the added benefit of utility; looking less like a suit orphan, it can be deployed as a blazer.



  1. TRC said:

    I agree: texture, texture, texture. And it doesn’t just go with navy suits. I refuse to buy or bespeak any suit in a plain solid worsted fabric.

    Though, the perpetual British disdain for lustre is sometimes misplaced as for e.g indoors very clement day like today, few things look more striking that a suit with some mohair weaved in! And mohair we know is shiny! Perhaps ‘shine’ it is a vestige of the polyester number of yesteryear which haunts us still.


    Your writings are missed.

    May 22, 2015

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